Prole reader and writer group

Prole reader and writer group

Reader and writer blog.

This blog is for readers to share their reflections about the poetry, stories and essays published in Prole. Our writers are encouraged to pop in from time to time and contribute to discussion threads.

Brief biographies of our writers can also be found here.

This is an open blog - good manners should prevail at all times!

Navigation: All bios for a particular issue are listed below the image for that issue. Click on the word 'comments' to leave your response.
There is no need to to login with email and password: that's for administration only.
Where it asks for 'author' - that's your name - not the name of the author you're responding to.

Sign, by Trudie Homan

PoetryPosted by editor Tue, August 20, 2013 21:08:27
Reflection on and reaction to Sign, by Trudie Homan.

Trudie Homan is retired, but not retiring. She holds a BA in theatre and an MA in something else that also left her unprepared for her accounting career. How it all happened is unclear but was actually not as dull as it sounds. Her poetry is virtually unread and she is rarely published, but she performs it at every opportunity, being a hopeless exhibitionist. Due to the left brain/right brain issue, her interests are over the map. She is enabled by Fred. They divide their time between Kansas City and Chicago.

  • Comments(4)

Fill in only if you are not real





The following XHTML tags are allowed: <b>, <br/>, <em>, <i>, <strong>, <u>. CSS styles and Javascript are not permitted.
Posted by Norm Ledgin Tue, August 27, 2013 17:09:22

Trudy Homan's short poem, Sign, is both a vivid snapshot and a subtle story, likely a memory. Marvelous, how she can capture and even reinforce so much in so few words.

Posted by James Miller Fri, August 23, 2013 23:11:25

Here in the Mid-west away from the hustle and bustle of our East Coast elite and our West Coast avant-garde we rely on Trudie Homan and her getaway driver Fred Homan for her always thought provoking turns of phrase. Subtle, soft, smooth as a blended Scotch we stagger home from her readings arms across each other's shoulders in harmony, however off key, with the world once again. Sadly she submits to publish in far off shores among the language gifted of Wales while we plead "Oh come home kind missionary, and convert these Christians!"

Posted by Les Moody Fri, August 23, 2013 17:21:54

what I like about Trudie's poems are the artful turns that seem so natural. The cleverness that never seems clever or manufactured but more the product of astute inference. Elliptical narrative pushes the reader into what is not said but definitely understood.

Posted by Les Moody Fri, August 23, 2013 17:21:47

what I like about Trudie's poems are the artful turns that seem so natural. The cleverness that never seems clever or manufactured but more the product of astute inference. Elliptical narrative pushes the reader into what is not said but definitely understood.