Prole reader and writer group

Prole reader and writer group

Reader and writer blog.

This blog is for readers to share their reflections about the poetry, stories and essays published in Prole. Our writers are encouraged to pop in from time to time and contribute to discussion threads.

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The Clouds in My Head, by Jack Kline

FictionPosted by editor Sat, December 08, 2012 22:19:09
Reaction to and reflection on The Clouds in My Head, by Jack Kline.

Jack Kline began seriously writing in 2005, although he’d piddled around some with storytelling throughout his life. Jack’s ‘seriously written’ short stories and essays have won several awards and his work has appeared in numerous publications, including the popular Chicken Soup for the Soul book series and Prole’s Issue Six. His collection of short stories, Blowing Carbon, was published in 2009. He lives with his family, dogs and horses near Louisburg, Kansas, USA.

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Posted by Jack Kline Wed, April 10, 2013 03:09:24

Thanks, Claire and Sophie. You both are too kind.

I am so pleased that you recognized and felt the same emotions that I experienced writing the story. Maybe it sounds pretentious or in this case, sappy, but I try to become the point-of-view character as I write - sort of "method-acting" writing.

Sheesh, reading what I just wrote, it does sound pretentious. But it's true, and it hurt a bit to write this one, and now I too look at strangers with a different eye.

Posted by Sophie Whitley Flavell Sun, February 24, 2013 15:55:19

There isn't a word wasted in this fine story. Among a haze of clouds and sunshine, we are witness to the protagonist's regrets: his selfishness and his non-action towards his partner, his son and, more profoundly, the homeless man. It is a wonderful story that pulls at the reader's moral conscience.

Posted by Claire Booker Thu, February 07, 2013 18:06:19

Beautifully written, Jack. I wondered if guilt lay behind the story. It's made me think a lot more about the strangers I pass and ignore each day.

Posted by Jack Kline Wed, February 06, 2013 04:29:40

I saw a version ot the panhandler in my story at that very intersection on my way to a writers workshop. I didn't give him anything. And I wondered about him off and on that day. This story sort of metasticized from the vague guilt I felt.

Posted by Jack Kline Wed, February 06, 2013 04:29:23

I saw a version ot the panhandler in my story at that very intersection on my way to a writers workshop. I didn't give him anything. And I wondered about him off and on that day. This story sort of metasticized from the vague guilt I felt.

Posted by Trudie Homan Sun, January 06, 2013 06:12:16

The heavy reality of the narrator's situation is effectively revealed as he describes, through shock and confusion, the lightness and dreaminess of cloud gazing on a beautiful day -- reminding us how much of life we ignore while absorbed with trivia, how quickly that life can turn, how soon it can become too late. Thanks, Jack.